Episode 120 :: Lenorë Lambert :: Secular Buddhism Australia

| June 1, 2012 | 1 Comment

Lenorë Lambert

Lenorë Lambert joins us to speak about the new Secular Buddhism Australia website.

There’s a great deal of discussion online lately about what secular Buddhism is, and what are the views of people who designate as secular Buddhists. Of course there is no one and only secular Buddhism, and there is a great diversity in attitudes, practices, and expectations of the people involved. One thing you can say, however, is that secular Buddhism as a means of learning and practice, is growing.

As of this recording in June of 2012, there are websites specifically about secular Buddhism based in Australia, Canada, England, Germany, Scotland, New Zealand, and the United States — with more being planned, and that’s not even counting FaceBook pages for secular Zen, atheist meditation, or humanist mindfulness. Each has complementary content, and each has something valuable to add to our growing community. And each site is sharing a common interest of opening the doors of a secular practice in our contemporary society.

Director and co-Founder of The Interview Group, Lenorë Lambert is an organisational psychologist with more than 15 years experience in HR and a passion for understanding how people behave in a business environment. Lenorë co-founded The Interview Group with Matthew Ma, and the Group practices Profit for Positive Change, contributing 10% of annual profits to causes that protect all living creatures from cruelty and oppression, and protecting the natural environment. Lenorë has been a meditator for eight years, and is using her organizational skills from the corporate world to support the ongoing development of secular Buddhism.

So, sit back, relax, and have a nice Fosters Lager. We don’t always have to drink tea, you know.

:: Discuss this episode ::

Web Links

Music for This Episode

Ajikan

Chikuzen Shakuhachi Series

The music heard in the middle of the podcast is from the Chikuzen Shakuhachi Series, Volume 1, courtesy of Tai Hei Shakuhachi. The tracks used in this episode are:

  • Track 8 :: Tamuke

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Category: The Secular Buddhist Podcast

Ted Meissner

About the Author ()

Ted Meissner is the host of the podcast Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science. He has been a meditator since the early 90’s, has been interviewed for Books and Ideas, Mindful Lives, and The Whole Leader podcasts, spoken about mindfulness with various groups including Harvard Humanist Hub, and has written for Elephant Journal and The International Journal of Whole Person Care. He is the Executive Director of the Secular Buddhist Association, host of the SBA’s official podcast The Secular Buddhist, and is on the Advisory Board for the Spiritual Naturalist Society. Ted’s background is in the Zen and Theravada traditions, he is a regular speaker on interfaith panel discussions, and is interested in examining the evolution of contemplative practice in contemporary culture. Ted teaches Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care & Society, where he is the Manager of Online Programming and Community Development.

Comments (1)

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  1. Candol says:

    Hi Lenore, and Ted. Interesting discussion. Thanks. Nice to hear a good old aussie voice speaking here.

    Lenore did you say you were running your sangha as a business?

    I gave you some resources for the heart but they didn’t come up on your page. Two wonderful films – The Wild parrots of Telegraph Hill and Departures which is a Japanese film. There is buddhism at different levels in both these films. The parrots is a documentary about a guy in San Francisco.

    and a film with a religious take that i saw recently on SBS was Spring Summer Autumn Winter which was a beautiful korean buddhist movie with a traditional approach but so very beautiful.

    Oh yes on the topic of catholics in Australia who use birth control but call themselves catholic, maybe they are being slightly secular catholics but haven’t quite figured that out yet. In that they don’t accept the authority of the pope but they do follow and practice most catholic values, rejecting only what doesn’t make sense to them. I suspect that this is the way most people across the world practice their religion, most buddhists included. Certainly they are just doing what is comfortable for them. Certainly they are not rejecting catholicism.

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