Stephen Schettini

Stephen Schettini is The Naked Monk — writer, blogger and teacher of Mindful Reflection. After eight years as a monk in the Tibetan tradition he decided that ritual, tradition and belief were an unnecessary burden, and returned to secular life. He remains an admirer and student of the historical Buddha without any Buddhist affiliations.

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Stephen Schettini's Latest Posts

So What?

| May 14, 2012 | 133 Comments
So What?

—On Glenn Wallis and Speculative Non-Buddhism (provoked by Wallis’s article, On the Faith of Secular Buddhists) The hardest thing I ever did was walk away from Buddhism. It had saved my sanity and my life. After decades of self-destructive behavior, I’d found myself at home in the arms of the Tibetan Diaspora. After years of […]

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Good Faith, Bad Faith

| April 22, 2012 | 36 Comments
Good Faith, Bad Faith

While watching the Dalai Lama on YouTube the other day I was struck by a strange sensation. I was bored. Now don’t get me wrong. I like this ‘simple monk’ as Tenzin Gyatso likes to call himself. I had a long private audience with him years ago in Dharamsala that left me flying high for […]

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The Double-bind of Guru Devotion

| December 18, 2011 | 8 Comments
The Double-bind of Guru Devotion

Stephen Schettini was asked by a correspondent about his insights on the guru-disciple relationship and the suitability/pitfalls of such a model in the modern age. He was asked, “How did you cope with rejecting those relationships in your own life; and now with your role as a teacher how do you approach this?” First, the […]

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Gautama Buddha: Man or God?

| November 12, 2011 | 5 Comments
Gautama Buddha: Man or God?

Vishvapani Blomfield’s Gautama Buddha: The Life and Teachings of the Awakened One is one of a new breed of Buddha biographies. For centuries there was really only one. Ashvaghosha’s epic poem Buddhacarita (Acts of the Buddha), written some three hundred years after the Buddha’s death, paints the Buddha myth familiar to generations of Buddhists. A […]

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