Dhammapada- FLOWERS ( Let’s Discuss)

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Shane Presswood Shane Presswood 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #41887
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    4/28/18
    Flowers

    While it has been a few days since I studied the dharma in the Dhammapada I have indeed had many mixed emotions and experiences taught to me. I feel I May have been too critical of myself in some aspects of my study and yet lenient in others. To determine where each one of those labels lye I must continue on in the moment. I consistently have been working out at least five days per week for almost two months now and continue not to get pin the scale or take any measurements. I vow to myself to not even look at stats until at least after the sixty day marker. I have begun watching what I eat and been working on the mindful journal fro about a week now as well. I continue to work forty plus hours, read the two books I’ve been reading (the Dan Harris and Rabgye ones) and am now onto this scripture that speaks of flowers. Let’s get down to it. I feel it is important to check in with myself and where I am and what I am doing along this journey.

    “The disciple will overcome the earth, and the world of Yama, and the world of the gods. The disciple will find the plainly shown path of virtue, as a clever man finds the right flower.”

    This one goes into some depth about the ancient Hindu gods and I interpret it as being quite agnostic in its tone. Yama is the god of death and the disciple I am going to say is any man who chooses to study the path of the Buddha’s teaching of the eightfold path described in the fourth noble truth. I also feel this passage is yet another reference towards man not needing outside influence to live a virtuous life.

    “He who knows that this body is like froth, and has learnt that it is as unsubstantial as a mirage, will break the flower-pointed arrow of Mara and never see the king of death.”

    Mara is the tempter as she was before. This passage to me speaks to the impermanence of body and form as described as one of the aggregates.

    Shane

  • #41890
    Jennifer Hawkins
    Jennifer Hawkins
    Keymaster

    Keep up the self-motivational posts!

    ::nods head at how you are looking at various lines::

    I find it interesting that you see Mara as female.

  • #41899
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    Thanks Jennifer! Is anyone else on these boards. Ha!

    Also it’s not that I see Mara as female, the Dhammapada unabridged version from Dover Thrift stated Mara as a female. Mara is Mara more of a unisex being in my opinion.

    Shane

  • #41903
    Jennifer Hawkins
    Jennifer Hawkins
    Keymaster

    We have a TON of lurkers, which is fine, but yeah… this is what happens.

    It doesn’t help that I’m Community Director, so when I actually am able to deal with posting/replying, I mean, the urge is strong not to have someone feel discouraged by how lurker-heavy we are. I swear, we chat a lot – but whereas it used to be on the forums, since a website update a year or two ago, it has shifted to FB, emails, and at Practice Circle, lol.

    It also doesn’t help that you’re talking about some of my fav topics. I even made sort of a “thinking out loud” FB post using “Flowers” as a focal point, and that was only yesterday.

  • #41943
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    “As many kinds of wreaths can be made rom a heap of flowers, so many good things may be achieved by a mortal when once he is born. The scent of flowers does not travel against the wind, nor that of sandal-wood, or of Tagara and Mallika flowers, but the odor of good people travels even against the wind; a good man pervades every place.”

    My interpretation:
    As a person goes through life they come across many different types of personalities. Not only in people, but in situations of what may be considered good or bad. The perception is the key here, and the engagement even more. If you are to participate and follow the path of something that is less wholesome then you will indeed get that back in karma. If you choose to act in a way that is against the wind of negative change and it is virtuous and filled with integrity, then you will get that back instead. This is more that you reap what you sew, it is about mind, body and actions of both.

    Shane

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