"Metta" analogies in other religions?

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 9 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #40003

    Anonymous

    Hi there! I’ve been wondering about universal love, metta, and any other religions’ approaches to this idea. Christianity’s take seems easy to find, is anyone familiar with the Muslim, Hindu, or other religions’ equivalent?

  • #40010
    Michael Finley
    Michael Finley
    Participant
  • #40023
    Michael Finley
    Michael Finley
    Participant

    And I didn’t know love & compassion were just meditations ….

  • #40024

    Anonymous

    Hehe, touché. However, Sir, surely a meditation is more powerful than a “rule,” in this case, imvho. Nevin

  • #40025
    Michael Finley
    Michael Finley
    Participant

    Nevin,

    I don’t think the so-called golden rule is really a rule in the usual sense, not in the sense you seem to be implying. A rule is, I suppose, usually a prescription imposed by some authority — and thus no more compelling on its face than faith in the authority. “Thou shalt not” because I say so …. If there is other reason for the rule, it’s not contained in the rule itself. The golden “rule,” on the other hand, seems to me to make a direct appeal to our capacity for empathy. It doesn’t just command me to be good, it appeals not just because Jesus/Confucius/Buddha said so, but because it challenges me to recognize the moral truth that I have no greater (or lesser) claim to be treated with compassion & good will than those I treat with.

    Perhaps the insight this provokes is as good as meditation — perhaps, in fact, it may be a meditation.

    Metta

  • #40029

    Mark Knickelbine
    Keymaster

    Nevin, in terms of a specific meditation practice, I’m not familiar with one. However, many contemplative traditions take up love as their object. These are usually conceived as loving communion with God as opposed to others, although this experience is thought to improve one’s compassion for other people as well. For me, though, it seems like there’s a profound similarity between metta and loving devotion to God, at least as a tradition like the Sufis describes it. One allows one’s self to open fully to the yearning for connection and love, and discovers that this yearning is itself the source of unlimited and unconditional love. Giving and receiving love are experienced as a single, unified movement of the heart, and this gesture becomes the object of one’s meditation.

    • #40031

      Anonymous

      I’ll definitely look into this, Mark, thank you sir. What it makes me wonder is, do Muslim practitioners hold Sufiism as an acceptable application of Islam.

  • #40357

    jscottanderson
    Participant

    Agape

    • #40386

      Anonymous

      Merci Messieur.

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