The Dhammapada

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Shane Presswood Shane Presswood 4 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #41824
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    Hey fellow SBA peeps!

    I have decided to add a component to my current studies and am looking for some insight (excuse the pun) to some pointers during this portion of my journey!

    Here is my initial entry on my study:

    4/14/18

    Today I begin a study of the Dhammapada. I am primarily using the resource from Dover Thrift Editions called “The Wisdom of Buddha”. I am still finishing up the Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics by Dan Harris, How to Catch a Snake by Karama Yeshe Rabgye while also staying engaged with The Secular Buddhism Association. The reasons I have started studying The Dhammapada (The Path to Virtue) is because it contains actual Pāli Canon texts that I was encouraged to start getting into along my early journey. The first thing I am going to do is take a brief moment to research the history of The Path to Virtue in history.

    The Dhammapada (Pāli; Prakrit: धम्मपद Dhammapada;[1]) is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures.[2] The original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya, a division of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism. (Wikipedia)

    This explanation is a brief, yet to the point. There of course is a much more profound than I will go into right now. This study’s purpose is for me to take a look at actual writings of Buddha and develop a better understanding of them.

    The Twin-Verses

    “All that we are is the result of what we have thought it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts.”

    Gassho,
    Shane

  • #41826
    Jennifer Hawkins
    Jennifer Hawkins
    Keymaster

    I really, really like this post and appreciate you posting it.

    I like the idea of keeping a kind of “Dhamma study journal” along with all of the other reading you are doing. (I hope you are practicing as well.) It could also be extremely beneficial to others to see what another is doing and how they are progressing along the Path, so again, thank you for sharing this.

    The Dhammapada is a good starting place. My favorites are probably “Violence” and “Flowers.” “Violence” I quote often and use as a general guide in difficult situations. “Flowers” is difficult to fully consume (it’s complex), and that’s part of the draw. “Evil” is a section I struggled with when I first encountered it. In fact, I posted about that somewhere on the forums if you can find it, lol. And then there are other sections that have deeper parallels in other suttas of the Pali Canon (“Elephant,” “Brahmins”), and while I prefer the other versions, I certainly welcome their inclusion in the Dhammapada as well.

    Anyways, happy study. May you be well and meet with growth and success.

    Listen to the Suttas!
    https://tinyurl.com/yaeza39j

  • #41827
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    Hey Jennifer! Your on it! I appreciate th feedback. I am definitely practicing and actually had the chance To attend a 4 hour retreat with yoga and meditation this morning! This is very rare in my area. Most of my interaction with other like minded practitioners is virtual. I was hoping to attend the next practice circle meeting, however if they are only the second and fourth Sunday I will be at work. I work 2pm-10pm CST five days a week inckuding every other weekend. The New Zealand virtual options seem to be when working as well. Any other suggestions to connect more in person or at least in real time?

    Gassho,
    Shane

  • #41834
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    Buddhism has many different structures of philosophy including the precepts, the poisons and the four noble truths to guard against non-temperance. I will continue to learn, practice and grow into following them.
    There is a lot verse discussing the following vain desires and combating it with the passion. I am seeing this passion as drive to learn and practice the eight fold path with the foundation of the four noble truths.

    Gassho,
    Shane

  • #41964
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    ”If a traveler does not meet with one who is his better, or his equal, let him firmly keep to his solitary journey; there is no companionship with a fool.”

    I LOVE this passage! To me it simply means what I am coming to find out more and more as I move through this journey of life. It is about the people one chooses to hang out with. If they are not in the same or better situation than I am then they are not benefitting me in any kind of way. They can actually be very bad for my mental, physical and emotional states. This is not to say that I have to completely isolate myself from others that are in a “lesser” place than I, but I do need to caution against feeding into their negative ways or allow them to bring me away from what I have been maintaining in my own personal life.

    Gassho,
    Shane

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