What is your Goal?

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Shane Presswood Shane Presswood 6 days, 9 hours ago.

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  • #41741
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    As I continue to study the four noble truths to develop my baseline understanding I also continue to listen to the Buddhism Guide podcast. Karma Yeshe Rabgye and I have exchanged some notes and will continue to do so.

    Today I listened to the “What is Your Goal?” from Rabgye. Although, I do like his take on finding your own way and using your own experiences as one studies and practices Buddhism, I also conduct research of other articles.

    What are some places (besides those on this site) does everyone else use and what study methods and what practice techniques (aside from meditation) do some of the rest of you utilize?

    Metta
    SNPII

    SNPII

  • #41742

    Doug Greve
    Participant

    I like Non-violent communication (NVC) as a way to practice right speech. It was developed by Marshall Rosenberg in the 70s. He has a book or two on it. NVC is very accessible and works quite well with a buddhist practice. The name is not quite accurate, should be non-blaming or non-shaming communication. The basic idea is that everyone has needs and you need other people to help you meet your needs. But it is very threatening to acknowledge having a need, so one reinterprets one’s need as a flaw in someone else. Blaming/shaming them then becomes a way to get them to help you meet your need without ever acknowledging even having a need (to yourself or to anyone else). The result is a hostile environment; further, people become alienated from their needs — if you don’t really know what you need, it is hard to get your needs met. In the NVC method, an interaction starts with an non-controversial statement of fact (twice this week you did not clean up your dishes), a statement of an emotion connected to a need (I became angry because I need order and cleanliness), and a request for something that enhances life (Would you be willing to clean up your dishes in a timely fashion?). It is not an easy thing to do — it requires a lot of equanimity. But I think it is really helpful even when practiced imperfectly.

  • #41769

    Mark Knickelbine
    Keymaster

    My most valuable continuing education comes from the teachers I work with as part of the UW Health Mindfulness community, who are always learning new techniques and sharing them with us.

    If you haven’t read it yet, Stephen Batchelor’s “Buddhism Without Beliefs” is a great introduction to basic dharma teaching from a secular perspective. Other than that, and reading the suttas themselves, Ted’s podcast and the book reviews we’ve posted on the site should keep you busy a long time!

    As far as practice is concerned, other than the sitting, walking, body scan and metta practices I learned in MBSR, I have been trained in Insight Dialogue, a mindful listening and speaking method; Focusing, a contemplative technique that helps one get in touch with the wisdom of the body; and my favorite movement practices, tai chi and qi gong.

    Mark

    • #41820
      Shane Presswood
      Shane Presswood
      Participant

      Thanks Mark! I did just hear about Bachelor in a recent SBA podcast I listened too!

      SNPII

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