Looking for Beginner Zen Based Resources

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  steve mareno 4 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #42442
    Shane Presswood
    Shane Presswood
    Participant

    Hey fellow SBA peeps!

    I think it is time to start studying on a more focused effort and practicing one of the three main realms of Buddhism; Theravada, Zen, Tibetan.

    I am looking for a more practice based orientated resource base.

    What are some suggestions?

  • #42468
    ScottPen
    ScottPen
    Participant

    By the title you seem to be leaning towards zen. There are two zen traditions, rinzai and Soto. They have practice and philosophy variations. All zen group practice includes some chanting and there’s usually a pretty rigid ceremony, which zen practitioners really love and feel helps them practice. Try reading some of Brad Warner’s books for a modern take using informal vernacular. Also check out the “Shobogenzo” by Dogen, thought by many to be the seminal masterwork of zen.
    Really, find a zendo near you and go. More than once. Then find another and repeat. Talk to the teacher. Just try’em out.

    If there isn’t one near you try Trealeaf Sangha, an online Soto zen practice group.

  • #42513
    XenMan
    XenMan
    Participant

    Sorry to jump on this late.

    Zen is awesome for practical application in the modern world. I started almost 30 years ago and it saved me from some very dark times.

    I started with Charlotte Joko Beck’s “Everyday Zen”, and “Zen in the martial arts”. Brad Warner is a good modern exponent.

    Zen is very similar to self CBT as you view situations from a different perspective to have a more positive response. I had a top 5 Zen sayings that kept me cool in any situation, I can’t remember or I would share them.

    The limits of Zen is the meditation, with Zazen working well for some, and not so well for others as it doesn’t guide as much as Tibetan which give a wide range of distractive techniques, through to contemplation.

    I have never done the Zendo thing as I prefer to explore these things myself, but they look the most accessible from a secular perspective.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by XenMan XenMan. Reason: Formatting

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